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wardo

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I've never been but have always wanted to go. I've been planning to get started for the last ten years or so but something always comes up(babies,birthdays,sports, family get-togethers, laziness ect..) Now my oldest (10 yrs old) is getting old enough to go and my 3 year old is definitely interested. Even my wife agrees it looks like fun, when I watch duck hunting on tv. What is the best way to get started? I have a lab, what should her skill level be before taking her out? Where is the best place for a newbe to start off? I want to take this season to get started and learn the ropes. Please point me in the right direction. Thanks
 

wardo

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QUOTE (STEVE IN SOCAL @ Sep 22 2010, 10:16 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284424
A fat checkbook is a must... :smiley-cool-shades-down:

This should probably be another topic but: what should I expect to spend a year? I don't think I want to know, but let me have it.
 

ESSposse

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Grab some 5 day draws. You're 2 hours from S.J.W.A. and 4 hours from Wister. Put in for all the days you can. LEAVE THE DOG AT HOME.

You get a draw...... post it up and an expirienced WFH will take you out and show you the basic ropes. You'll need Steel shot, waders, being able to totally camo yourself out head to toe, some sort of blind bag to haul your gear out with you. You'll be expected to help haul the decoys out.... set them up... pick them up and haul 'em back. Most importantly...... your blind bag MUST include some really good munchies!!!! :smiley-dancin-red: That's a must.
 

Band Collector

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First off, you are going to need a hunting license, which requires taking a hunters safety course and passing an exam. The courses are offered throughout the state. Checking with a local gun store may get you the info on courses offered in your area.

Assuming you have a shotgun you will need some practice shooting it. Spend some time at a local gun range that offers trap and skeet shooting of clay targets. You do not need a hunting license for this activity. I feel shooting skeet is more appropriate for hunting ducks than shooting trap which is appropriate for hunting flushing birds like pheasant and quail. This activity can be challenging, not that expensive and alot of fun as well.

After you have obtained your hunting license and have become proficient with your shotgun you are ready to take it to the neaxt level...
 

fish dog

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QUOTE (STEVE IN SOCAL @ Sep 22 2010, 10:16 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284424
A fat checkbook is a must... :smiley-cool-shades-down:



For sure. Ka Ching!

I'm not a dog training expert but at the very least the dog would need to be trained in basic obedience. In other words, sit, stay, come so its at least not running amok through the refuge disturbing other hunters. Then you can work on retrieving, but that would be best done off season, not during a hunt. As for equipment, a hunting license with state and federal duck stamps, a shotgun (of course), ammo (non-toxic shot - steel most common and most inexpensive), waders (chest high is usually needed - may be able to get away with hip boots but it will limit you), a few decoys (probably at least a dozen to get started - If you don't have a few out adjacent hunters will accuse you of shooting at "their" birds), a good waterfowl ID book (due to the different limits on different species you need to know what you're shooting), a duck call - maybe (but please either use a pintail whistle or, if you insist on a mallard call, learn how to use it first or you'll just spook birds for yourself and the blinds around you - also, a call isn't magic. It won't make birds suddenly appear if there are none flying in the air at the time), camo clothing - hat, t-shirt, shirt, jacket, rain coat (no need for camo pants, the waders will cover your pants anyway) and, if you don't own a truck you might want to buy one since a car won't carry all this crap you're going to need and wifey will take a dim view of muddy waders and wet decoys in the back seat of the family car.

Good luck - have fun.

Oh, and I almost forgot, since you're wanting to take the kids, the 10 year old would be great, I think the 3 year old would be a little young, you'll need to buy camo and waders for the kid too (which he will outgrow by next season, LOL).

Also, you're almost as close to Kern, google maps says 2 hr 50 min to Kern and 2 hr 24 min to San Jacinto.
 

raybanfoxman

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Wardo, you're gonna love it.

This is such a broad question, and with such an extensive undertaking, that it REALLY helps to have an "insider" that's been doing it for a while to help you learn. The first thing I would do is get the most basic requirements, in relation to already having someone with experience to go with (Meaning, let him bring the decoys and calls:) )

Things you must have:
1) Hunting license ($41.50) with a Ca Duck stamp ($18.10) and a Federal Duck stamp ($15)

2) Hunting waders - Here's where the debates will start. There are 2 basic types, breathable and neoprene. Since it's not too cold in CA, I'd go breathable. But it's up to you. Wader sock also a good idea, for comfort purposes.

3) Camo Jacket, shirt, hat and the like - It gets wet, waterproof camo jackets are everywhere, see what you like, get something that fits with the weather you'll be in, and an undershirt that's camo for when the clouds part and it gets hot.

4)Gun/ammo - 12 gauge is preferred. Steel (or non-toxic) ammo is required. Look up steel and non-toxic online. And again, this is whatever you'd prefer, experience will let you see the difference between the different size shot and velocities. If you shoot a 12 gauge 3" shell, I'd recommend Kent Faststeel, 3" #3's to start with - good all around, affordable round.

5)Accessories - There are a lot of things that fall into this category, but they all make your life way easier when walking to and from the hunting area. Here are a few:
A) Duck strap - A game strap to carry the ducks back
B ) Blind Bag - Your toolbox to carry ammo, sunglasses, wallet, food, cig's, camera, etc
C) Duck calls - this one I might leave to your experienced buddy, but get one to see how bad you can piss him/her off.

Now, there is a lottery system in CA for duck hunters. You basically put your name in a pool of hunters for different hunt days and different hunting areas. You can read a pretty good article on this in the new issue of California Waterfowl Association's magazine, or go online, or talk with one of us. I would recommend getting into the draws, because if you get drawn for a day, you are guaranteed a spot to hunt at that particular hunting area, on that particular day.

And as for the dog, in my opinion, it's a poor learning environment for your dog to try to learn the sport, while you are. Leave the pooch at home until you feel you know enough to train your dog to do what you want.

Now, this is just the skeleton of what duck hunting is. It takes years to get into a groove and after 5 years of doing it, I know I still have much to learn. And again, your biggest asset at this point would be to find an experienced hunting partner to take you under their wing.

If you have questions, feel free to post. You can draw infinite knowledge from the awesome gents and ladies from this forum.

Good luck, Wardo. Let us know what you need help with!
 

wardo

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QUOTE (Band Collector @ Sep 22 2010, 10:31 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284433
First off, you are going to need a hunting license, which requires taking a hunters safety course and passing an exam. The courses are offered throughout the state. Checking with a local gun store may get you the info on courses offered in your area.

Assuming you have a shotgun you will need some practice shooting it. Spend some time at a local gun range that offers trap and skeet shooting of clay targets. You do not need a hunting license for this activity. I feel shooting skeet is more appropriate for hunting ducks than shooting trap which is appropriate for hunting flushing birds like pheasant and quail. This activity can be challenging, not that expensive and alot of fun as well.

After you have obtained your hunting license and have become proficient with your shotgun you are ready to take it to the neaxt level...


I've had my hunting license and shotgun for years, definetly need practice shooting it.
 

wardo

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QUOTE (ImissAlot @ Sep 22 2010, 10:35 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284435
Wardo, you're gonna love it.

This is such a broad question, and with such an extensive undertaking, that it REALLY helps to have an "insider" that's been doing it for a while to help you learn. The first thing I would do is get the most basic requirements, in relation to already having someone with experience to go with (Meaning, let him bring the decoys and calls:) )

Things you must have:
1) Hunting license ($41.50) with a Ca Duck stamp ($18.10) and a Federal Duck stamp ($15)

2) Hunting waders - Here's where the debates will start. There are 2 basic types, breathable and neoprene. Since it's not too cold in CA, I'd go breathable. But it's up to you. Wader sock also a good idea, for comfort purposes.

3) Camo Jacket, shirt, hat and the like - It gets wet, waterproof camo jackets are everywhere, see what you like, get something that fits with the weather you'll be in, and an undershirt that's camo for when the clouds part and it gets hot.

4)Gun/ammo - 12 gauge is preferred. Steel (or non-toxic) ammo is required. Look up steel and non-toxic online. And again, this is whatever you'd prefer, experience will let you see the difference between the different size shot and velocities. If you shoot a 12 gauge 3" shell, I'd recommend Kent Faststeel, 3" #3's to start with - good all around, affordable round.

5)Accessories - There are a lot of things that fall into this category, but they all make your life way easier when walking to and from the hunting area. Here are a few:
A) Duck strap - A game strap to carry the ducks back
B ) Blind Bag - Your toolbox to carry ammo, sunglasses, wallet, food, cig's, camera, etc
C) Duck calls - this one I might leave to your experienced buddy, but get one to see how bad you can piss him/her off.

Now, there is a lottery system in CA for duck hunters. You basically put your name in a pool of hunters for different hunt days and different hunting areas. You can read a pretty good article on this in the new issue of California Waterfowl Association's magazine, or go online, or talk with one of us. I would recommend getting into the draws, because if you get drawn for a day, you are guaranteed a spot to hunt at that particular hunting area, on that particular day.

And as for the dog, in my opinion, it's a poor learning environment for your dog to try to learn the sport, while you are. Leave the pooch at home until you feel you know enough to train your dog to do what you want.

Now, this is just the skeleton of what duck hunting is. It takes years to get into a groove and after 5 years of doing it, I know I still have much to learn. And again, your biggest asset at this point would be to find an experienced hunting partner to take you under their wing.

If you have questions, feel free to post. You can draw infinite knowledge from the awesome gents and ladies from this forum.

Good luck, Wardo. Let us know what you need help with!


Is there a deadline to get into the lottery? Or can you put in for spots any time during the season. Thanks for the info, I've been a lurker on this sight for years, so I know you guys are full of good info. I am not against leaving my dog at home till I'm certain she will not ruin my or anyone elseses hunting experience, but taking her as well as the kids is definitely in the future plans. As for the blind bag and call can you or anyone else give a couple of examples of something to start off with?
 

Killer B

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QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 10:57 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284441
QUOTE (ImissAlot @ Sep 22 2010, 10:35 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284435
Wardo, you're gonna love it.

This is such a broad question, and with such an extensive undertaking, that it REALLY helps to have an "insider" that's been doing it for a while to help you learn. The first thing I would do is get the most basic requirements, in relation to already having someone with experience to go with (Meaning, let him bring the decoys and calls:) )

Things you must have:
1) Hunting license ($41.50) with a Ca Duck stamp ($18.10) and a Federal Duck stamp ($15)

2) Hunting waders - Here's where the debates will start. There are 2 basic types, breathable and neoprene. Since it's not too cold in CA, I'd go breathable. But it's up to you. Wader sock also a good idea, for comfort purposes.

3) Camo Jacket, shirt, hat and the like - It gets wet, waterproof camo jackets are everywhere, see what you like, get something that fits with the weather you'll be in, and an undershirt that's camo for when the clouds part and it gets hot.

4)Gun/ammo - 12 gauge is preferred. Steel (or non-toxic) ammo is required. Look up steel and non-toxic online. And again, this is whatever you'd prefer, experience will let you see the difference between the different size shot and velocities. If you shoot a 12 gauge 3" shell, I'd recommend Kent Faststeel, 3" #3's to start with - good all around, affordable round.

5)Accessories - There are a lot of things that fall into this category, but they all make your life way easier when walking to and from the hunting area. Here are a few:
A) Duck strap - A game strap to carry the ducks back
B ) Blind Bag - Your toolbox to carry ammo, sunglasses, wallet, food, cig's, camera, etc
C) Duck calls - this one I might leave to your experienced buddy, but get one to see how bad you can piss him/her off.

Now, there is a lottery system in CA for duck hunters. You basically put your name in a pool of hunters for different hunt days and different hunting areas. You can read a pretty good article on this in the new issue of California Waterfowl Association's magazine, or go online, or talk with one of us. I would recommend getting into the draws, because if you get drawn for a day, you are guaranteed a spot to hunt at that particular hunting area, on that particular day.

And as for the dog, in my opinion, it's a poor learning environment for your dog to try to learn the sport, while you are. Leave the pooch at home until you feel you know enough to train your dog to do what you want.

Now, this is just the skeleton of what duck hunting is. It takes years to get into a groove and after 5 years of doing it, I know I still have much to learn. And again, your biggest asset at this point would be to find an experienced hunting partner to take you under their wing.

If you have questions, feel free to post. You can draw infinite knowledge from the awesome gents and ladies from this forum.

Good luck, Wardo. Let us know what you need help with!


Is there a deadline to get into the lottery? Or can you put in for spots any time during the season. Thanks for the info, I've been a lurker on this sight for years, so I know you guys are full of good info. I am not against leaving my dog at home till I'm certain she will not ruin my or anyone elseses hunting experience, but taking her as well as the kids is definitely in the future plans. As for the blind bag and call can you or anyone else give a couple of examples of something to start off with?



Deadline for Lottery is 17 days before each hunt date. So for the opener you need to have it in by October 6th. There's a thread on here for waterfowl apps that contains the season long draw application. I'd put that one in if I were you, makes it a lot easier than filling out those stupid cards all the time. FYI SJ hunts on Wednesdays and Saturdays, Wister hunts on Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays.
 

wardo

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QUOTE (fish dog @ Sep 22 2010, 10:31 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284434
QUOTE (STEVE IN SOCAL @ Sep 22 2010, 10:16 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284424
A fat checkbook is a must... :smiley-cool-shades-down:



For sure. Ka Ching!

I'm not a dog training expert but at the very least the dog would need to be trained in basic obedience. In other words, sit, stay, come so its at least not running amok through the refuge disturbing other hunters. Then you can work on retrieving, but that would be best done off season, not during a hunt. As for equipment, a hunting license with state and federal duck stamps, a shotgun (of course), ammo (non-toxic shot - steel most common and most inexpensive), waders (chest high is usually needed - may be able to get away with hip boots but it will limit you), a few decoys (probably at least a dozen to get started - If you don't have a few out adjacent hunters will accuse you of shooting at "their" birds), a good waterfowl ID book (due to the different limits on different species you need to know what you're shooting), a duck call - maybe (but please either use a pintail whistle or, if you insist on a mallard call, learn how to use it first or you'll just spook birds for yourself and the blinds around you - also, a call isn't magic. It won't make birds suddenly appear if there are none flying in the air at the time), camo clothing - hat, t-shirt, shirt, jacket, rain coat (no need for camo pants, the waders will cover your pants anyway) and, if you don't own a truck you might want to buy one since a car won't carry all this crap you're going to need and wifey will take a dim view of muddy waders and wet decoys in the back seat of the family car.

Good luck - have fun.

Oh, and I almost forgot, since you're wanting to take the kids, the 10 year old would be great, I think the 3 year old would be a little young, you'll need to buy camo and waders for the kid too (which he will outgrow by next season, LOL).

Also, you're almost as close to Kern, google maps says 2 hr 50 min to Kern and 2 hr 24 min to San Jacinto.


I've got the dog off to a good start, but she will stay home as well as the 3 year old till I know they are ready to go. Dog maybe next season, 10 and 3(almost 4 and a tough kid) year old ??? I'll have to see what it's like before I can make a decision on when to take them.They are both gonna want to go right from the start. But I want to get a grasp on whats going on before taking them.
 

wardo

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Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?
 

Killer B

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QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:14 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284447
QUOTE (fish dog @ Sep 22 2010, 10:31 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284434
QUOTE (STEVE IN SOCAL @ Sep 22 2010, 10:16 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284424
A fat checkbook is a must... :smiley-cool-shades-down:



For sure. Ka Ching!

I'm not a dog training expert but at the very least the dog would need to be trained in basic obedience. In other words, sit, stay, come so its at least not running amok through the refuge disturbing other hunters. Then you can work on retrieving, but that would be best done off season, not during a hunt. As for equipment, a hunting license with state and federal duck stamps, a shotgun (of course), ammo (non-toxic shot - steel most common and most inexpensive), waders (chest high is usually needed - may be able to get away with hip boots but it will limit you), a few decoys (probably at least a dozen to get started - If you don't have a few out adjacent hunters will accuse you of shooting at "their" birds), a good waterfowl ID book (due to the different limits on different species you need to know what you're shooting), a duck call - maybe (but please either use a pintail whistle or, if you insist on a mallard call, learn how to use it first or you'll just spook birds for yourself and the blinds around you - also, a call isn't magic. It won't make birds suddenly appear if there are none flying in the air at the time), camo clothing - hat, t-shirt, shirt, jacket, rain coat (no need for camo pants, the waders will cover your pants anyway) and, if you don't own a truck you might want to buy one since a car won't carry all this crap you're going to need and wifey will take a dim view of muddy waders and wet decoys in the back seat of the family car.

Good luck - have fun.

Oh, and I almost forgot, since you're wanting to take the kids, the 10 year old would be great, I think the 3 year old would be a little young, you'll need to buy camo and waders for the kid too (which he will outgrow by next season, LOL).

Also, you're almost as close to Kern, google maps says 2 hr 50 min to Kern and 2 hr 24 min to San Jacinto.


I've got the dog off to a good start, but she will stay home as well as the 3 year old till I know they are ready to go. Dog maybe next season, 10 and 3(almost 4 and a tough kid) year old ??? I'll have to see what it's like before I can make a decision on when to take them.They are both gonna want to go right from the start. But I want to get a grasp on whats going on before taking them.



I think 4 is a little young for an all day thing....might be okay for an afternoon refill. You would have to pick your spots according to what he could get to also, some blinds have long wades in fairly deep water to get to him. You could buy a sled and tow him behind you though.
 

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QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:24 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284448
Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?


For wader get the Cabela's breathable stocking foot waders and wader boots. It is much easier to walk in the mud with these type of waders and boots. The breathable are a must for early season hunting.
 

ESSposse

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QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:24 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284448
Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?



Best advice is to go out a couple/few times and see if you're really into it. No sence in buying decoys and calls and A LOT of expensive stuff before you really see what it's about.

Just get the basics and take it from there.
 

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QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:24 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284448
Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?

Green head gear makes variety packs of pintail,widgeon,teal for decs and I would reccomend buying stocking foot neoprene waders with separate wading boots unless you like being stuck in mud knee high.
 

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QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:24 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284448
Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?

I have 6 Mallard deeks I'll give you I live in Santa Clarita if you ever head down this way they are yours...
 

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QUOTE (ESSposse @ Sep 22 2010, 11:46 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284455
QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:24 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284448
Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?



Best advice is to go out a couple/few times and see if you're really into it. No sence in buying decoys and calls and A LOT of expensive stuff before you really see what it's about.

Just get the basics and take it from there.

:smiley_10sign: great point. If you really get into it, you dont have to go far from where you live at all *hint hint* :smiley-cool-shades-down: but you'll have to figure that out by yourself lol. To be honest, I say get your license and stamps, maybe 2 boxes of steel shot, waders, and just get out there. Maybe leave the kid at home the first time. Hunting at S.J and Wister is NOT what you see on t.v. I wouldnt recommend decoys yet. Besides, at SJ a good number of spots produce better without decoys. Oh and shoot all those funny sounding black ducks in the water...they're real good eating. :smiley-clappin-yellow: (Please disregard the last sentence)
 

wardo

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QUOTE (QB7940 @ Sep 22 2010, 12:09 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284459
QUOTE (ESSposse @ Sep 22 2010, 11:46 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284455
QUOTE (wardo @ Sep 22 2010, 11:24 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=284448
Decoys, what kind/species how many to start off with? Waders? What's a good name brand?



Best advice is to go out a couple/few times and see if you're really into it. No sence in buying decoys and calls and A LOT of expensive stuff before you really see what it's about.

Just get the basics and take it from there.

:smiley_10sign: great point. If you really get into it, you dont have to go far from where you live at all *hint hint* :smiley-cool-shades-down: but you'll have to figure that out by yourself lol. To be honest, I say get your license and stamps, maybe 2 boxes of steel shot, waders, and just get out there. Maybe leave the kid at home the first time. Hunting at S.J and Wister is NOT what you see on t.v. I wouldnt recommend decoys yet. Besides, at SJ a good number of spots produce better without decoys. Oh and shoot all those funny sounding black ducks in the water...they're real good eating. :smiley-clappin-yellow: (Please disregard the last sentence)


I think I know what your hinting at. I've heard and seen some things but have yet to positively confirm.
 

quackquackboom!!

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just go to SJWA. You'll fit right in. No experience required. :smiley_rotflmao: Just go with someone that knows the rules and regs.
 
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