Duck Hunting Article I Wrote To Help Beginners

bux-n-dux

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I recently wrote an article on how to begin duck hunting for less than $500.00. TOF moderators said it would be alright if I posted it here. This is just a hobby article....I am NOT a professional writer in any shade or sense of the word. So if you don't like my writing style or disagree with what I have to say, kiester it and pound sand. Take what you like and leave the rest. I have not been paid or otherwise swayed in any way to write what I have here. Companies and products are mentioned by name and price for reference and illustration only. ANYONE can read or access this article. However, it is copyrighted and protected against infringement reproduction for monetary gain, and cannot be used without permission. OK so with the legal FBI ##### out of the way, enjoy the article and if you know any new hunters tell them where to find it, should you find anything useful in it.



How To Get Started In Duck Hunting For Less Than $500.00.
By Nathan A. Dorris


The purpose of this article is to help the hunter on a budget and new to waterfowling get started. Many times I have heard prospective waterfowlers say that they would like to hunt waterfowl, but didnt have the resources to get started. A brief look through a hunting retailers catalog can really confirm this. Hunting, in particular waterfowling, can be very expensive at first glance. Hunting is a huge business these days, with more people and companies putting their products into the mix every year. It can really be overwhelming.
Cabelas, the worlds largest outdoor outfitter, carries over 100 types of duck calls and more than 50 varieties of decoys. How does someone new decide? Online reviews and newsstand magazines can help, and so can talking with other hunters, but what about the hunter who is limited on time as well as money? It is the purpose of this article to help.
First, let me say that the writer assumes that the hunter already has a good shotgun. In the event that is not the case, at the end of this article I give five examples of great waterfowl guns priced under $500.00. We must take a look at what a hunter would need to get out there and hunt ducks. The items mentioned and the recommendations made are from a utility, experience and functionality viewpoint, not high end luxury items. I am not a compensated endorser, a marketing executive, or a paid writer. I am nothing more than a broke, self-taught duck hunter. I have had a lot of help along the way, and now try to pass on the great sport that has been given to me. Some of the items I mention are things I started with and still use to this day. The prices mentioned are at the time of this writing, August 2011, and are by no means the only choices. Due diligence will yield more to the prospective hunter. This is a jumping-off point, nothing more. I have killed many ducks with my homemade, bare-bones gear and the cheapest clothing I could find. I have hunted with and next to hunters who had the most expensive clothing and guns along with the newest gear and gadgets and they did no better than I did, often worse. A hunter should rely on his skill and wit more than his equiptment. Hunters who blame their failures on lousy decoys or faulty gear just dont cut it in my opinion. But hey, we all know what opinions are like..

I have broken this article down into two sections: Apparel and hunting gear. Lets get started!!

1: APPAREL
Being dry and comfortable in the often inclement weather associated with waterfowling is essential. Nothing can make a hunter want to end a hunt prematurely and call it a day more than being wet and cold. This too goes for being too hot, as some early season hunts can be in higher temperatures. For the basics, apparel falls into four categories: Waders, hunting coats, hats and gloves.

WADERS:
There are basically three types of waders available for hunters. Neoprene, rubber or rubberized and breathable either in stocking or bootfoot. For a budget hunter breathable waders are pretty much out of the question, which leaves rubber and neoprene. My first waders (I still have and use them) were a very basic 5mm neoprene stockingfoot pair from Cabelas for $49.99. I added a pair of Itasca trooper-type boots on sale at Big 5 for $25.00 and was done. These waders lasted 7 seasons before developing a small leak in the seat (expertly repaired with Aqua Seal). I hunt refuges and small marshes and was pretty hard on these waders, and they have stood up well. They are VERY warm however, and long walks back to the truck would often result in me stewing in my own juices. But, they worked, and worked well. Cabelas still sells this model, although no longer in camo prints, but brown is all you need for duck hunting. I would suggest the 3MM weight over the 5MM, and a cheap pair of hiking type boots, at least 2 sizes larger than what you would normally wear.
Another choice is rubberized or 2 ply waders. These incorporate a rubberized 2 ply polyester fabric and have a rubber, insulated boot attached. I know 2 new hunters who chose these waders and were very happy with them. One of them will never go back to neoprene after wearing his 2 ply. They are not very warm, require more under layers than neoprene, and are not form-fitting. However you can regulate your warmth somewhat and the more open design of these waders allows for more hot air to escape on warm days. In a storm, the openness is solved by wearing a hunting coat over the waders. They are really tough waders, and less succeptable to leaks than neoprene. Also, these come with an insulated bootfoot, and theres no need to purchase shoes in addition to the waders. These waders can be found on clearance at great prices, often $50.00 or less. At the time of this article wingsupply.com had two different brands for $59.99 and one for $49.99, and they were available in Mossy Oak Duck Blind camo pattern.
Also check out waders marketed towards fisherman. Awesome deals in green or brown waders meant for people wading in streams with fly rods are out there.
Minimum Cost: $49.99, plus taxes and shipping if any.
Maximum Cost: $75.00, plus tax and shipping, if any.

JACKETS:
Just as important as waders are to dryness, warmth and comfort is a good jacket. Here we look at camo being more important than with waders, as our upper bodies are often more exposed than our lower bodies while duck hunting. My first waterfowling jacket was nothing more than a PVC shell in Mossy Oak Shadow Grass, made by Stearns. It was affordable and kept me dry. It didnt breathe though, and like neoprene would trap in the heat, so sometimes I would be damp from sweat after walking. Today those shells are still available, but there are also softer, breathable jackets available at a low cost. What you want most out of a waterfowling coat is for it to be waterproof (not water or weather resistant), have some pockets and a hood. There are two types of coats available: parkas and wading jackets. I suggest the wading jacket as it is much more versatile than a parka, and if you hunt refuges, you will be doing a lot of wading! Things can get expensive here, but there are options.

First is to look at military surplus. Often times large online surplus houses will have raincoats made of Gore-Tex or similar waterproof fabric for very cheap. And since they are military they will undoubtedly be some type of camo, or very brown or green. At the time of this article sportsmansguide.com had a German military Gore-Tex jacket for $29.97. If I was really on a tight budget, this would be my choice. Gore-Tex is famous for its dryness and dependability. Not the top of the line, but functional and it will keep you dry in the rain.
Also watch for sales online. At the time of this writing rogerssportinggoods.com had an excellent wading jacket, made by Fogg Toggs, for $59.99 with free shipping. Sportsmansguide.com also had a waterfowl jacket by Huntsworth for $49.99. A friend of mine got this as his first waterfowl coat and was very happy with it all during his first season. It kept him very dry and warm in many rainstorms.
Dont limit yourself to items marketed strictly for waterfowl though. A waterproof rain jacket marketed towards Virginia whitetail deer hunters will work just as good for a California waterfowler. You DO NOT NEED the latest duck blind camo pattern. Ive killed a lot of ducks wearing camo meant for the woods or jungle. I have also killed ducks wearing a brown jacket. Believe it or not, I have also killed ducks wearing shorts and a brown T shirt.
Minimum cost: $29.97 plus tax and shipping, if any.
Maximum cost: $59.99 plus tax and shipping, if any.

GLOVES:
Gloves are a very important part of the duck hunters clothing. They keep your hands warm and dry, and aid in concealment. Here, buying gloves NOT marketed towards waterfowling can save you some money. The most important thing when buying gloves is maneuverability. A thick, bulky glove does you no good if your fingers cant access the trigger of your gun and work your action quickly. Bulky gloves also make it difficult to reload. On dry, warmer days, if I am wearing gloves, I use some fingerless wool gloves I got from a surplus store years ago, or some simple brown cotton gloves which can be bought at most any hardware store for less than $10.00. But what about the freezing mornings of January? What about the rainstorms of December? For this the hunter needs something sturdier and waterproof. My first pair of gloves for duck hunting were neporene. They kept me dry, but had the same non-breathability of neoprene waders. Also, they had no lining and were not very warm when I was being still. Even though, some neoprene gloves will do the job, and are affordable. Most online retailers have them for under $20.00 a pair. Cabelas sells a pair of fleece-lined neoprene gloves for $24.99. These would be my pick for neoprene gloves.
I have found that whenever affordable, insulated gloves can really make a difference. Cabelas often sells their Camo-Skinz Gore-Tex hunting gloves for $29.99. Sportsmansguide.com sells waterproof hunting gloves for $14.97, for 2 pairs! These are wrist-length gloves, and while they are functional and will work, I have found the best gloves for hunting in rain and putting out and picking up decoys in cold weather to be gloves that extend above the wrist, and have adjustable cuffs. These can get pricey though, but there are some bargains out there. A good compromise for the higher price of these is ArcticShield H4 Camp Gloves. These have an adjustable wrist buckle, polyester lining, are waterproof and breathable. Rogerssportinggoods.com sells them for $19.99. Here our cost includes both dry and wet weather gloves.
Minimum cost: $24.97, plus tax and shipping of any.
Maximum cost: $39.99, plus taxes and shipping if any.

HATS:
All the waterfowler need for headwear is a baseball cap and warm beanie-type hat in camo or any earth-toned color. On sunny days the bill of a baseball cap can aid in vision and concealment. And on cold days, a warm beanie can make a big difference in comfort. There are many caps and hats available for well under $10.00, some will even be waterproof. For the purposes of this article, we will not get into expensive waterproof headwear. If it rains, use the hood on your hunting coat. I have a wool/synthetic beanie thats stops the wind and is very warm, and when it rains nothing keep me dryer than the hood on my coat. If you have an extended budget, Cabelas sells their Tru-Spec Boonie waterproof hat for $24.99. At this time wingsupply.com had over 15 different beanies and baseball caps for under $10.00, including a Gore-Tex/Thinsulate camo hat for $9.95.
Maximum Cost: $10.00 plus taxes and shipping, if any.

The only thing left to add for apparel that I didnt include is a shirt. If the hunter does not already have a long sleeve camo shirt, these can be gotten on clearance from any number of online retailers for under $10.00. ANY camo pattern or earth-toned color shirt will work. I have never paid more than $10.00 for a camo shirt, often much less. A long sleeve brown shirt from Walgreens or Goodwill will do just fine on a warm weather duck hunt.


2: HUNTING GEAR
As far as hunting gear goes, all the waterfowler needs are some decoys, a bag to carry them in, duck calls, and something to sit on.

DECOYS:
Here is where opinions run wild. For the sake of argument we will keep it very simple when talking about decoys. There are two basic types of decoys: water keel and weighted keel. Water keel are lighter, but not as stable on choppy water or in wind. I have both, but prefer weighted keel decoys. Again, opinions.Sizes also vary, but we will keep it to standard decoys for this article, as the bigger the decoy, the more expensive. Also included is information on decoy line and weights.
The beginning duck hunter will usually need no more than twelve decoys to start out with. More than that and things can get confusing. I first started with a dozen mallards, and later added some teal. A hunter could certainly start out with twelve mallards and do very well. Mallard decoys are less expensive than other species, and mallards can be found most anywhere ducks fly. A dozen mallard decoys can be had for under $40.00. Tanglefrees standard mallard decoys retail for just $22.99 a dozen. Flambeaus Storm Front decoys have weighted keels and are less than $30.00 a dozen. Rogerssportinggoods.com has them for $27.99 at the time of this article. An alternative to all mallards is to mix up your twelve decoys a bit. Visibility is a big part of a decoy spread. A great, common and highly visible decoy is the shoveler, or spoony. If I was to start out hunting today I would opt for 6 mallards and 6 shoveler decoys. I always have a couple of shovelers in my spread. A 6 pack of Storm Front premium mallard decoys retails for $29.99. A six pack of Greenhead Gear oversized shovelers retails for less than $40.00. Rogers has them for $36.99. Another good choice is the pintail. Six pintail decoys can be had at numerous retailers for under $40.00. Whatever the beginning hunter decides, it should be kept simple. Remember we are trying to get out to the marsh prepared, but on a budget. Twelve is all you need to make your beginning.

LINE AND WEIGHTS:
My first 12 decoys had brown jute twine I had in a kitchen drawer for line, and 3 and 4 oz oz lead fishing weights I had in an old tackle box for weights. They lasted 4 seasons rigged like this, and cost nothing. Some of my old decoys still have this rigging on them. Alternatively, you could use monofilament fishing line, and what is known as strap weights. Strap weights are long, soft lead weights that can wrap around the decoys neck. A dozen strap weights are less than $15.00 for 4 oz weights, which is all you will need. If you are not on too tight of a budget, you can purchase a Greenhead Gear decoy rigging kit from Cabelas for $24.99, but for the purpose of this article see what you have laying around the garage or workshop, or even the kitchen junk drawer.
Minimum cost: $22.99 plus taxes and shipping, if any (recommended)
Maximum cost: $66.98 plus taxes and shipping, if any

DECOY BAGS:
My first decoy bag was the cheapest one I could find, and I still have it. I actually lost it in a pond (it didnt float) and recovered it, intact, the next season. You should not spend more than $15.00 for a decoy bag. Even the most basic bag will hold up to 24 standard decoys, which will be plenty of room for the beginning hunter. You can almost always find a decoy bag on clearance for under $15.00. Wingsupply.com had four different models for under $15.00 when this article was being written, Cabelas had one, and Rogers had three. All will work, all have straps for carrying on your back, and all will last you many seasons.
Maximum cost: $15.00 plus taxes and shipping, if any.

SEATING:
The best seat for a waterfowler hunting marshes and refuges is by far and away a five gallon bucket with a lid. It is spacious, waterproof, light, inexpensive and versatile. A 5 gallon bucket will hold everything you need for a days hunting. I have had a big lunch, ample shells, a Thermos of coffee, water, all my choke tubes, and an extra hat, calls, gloves, and more stored in mine with room to spare. I started with one and still use it regularly. It can be set up and sat upon most anywhere, even in a few inches of water. You can make your own for very cheap. I made my first duck bucket and I still use it. You can buy a five gallon bucket for under $5.00 at most hardware stores, and a can of brown spray paint is less than that. Paint the bucket brown and purchase a bucket lid for $1.99. Alternatively, you can buy and paint the bucket and get a cushioned lid that swivels, or simply a cushion for the lid. The best deal on seats though is Cabelas bucket/spin seat combo for $14.99. Rogers sells a similar setup for $18.99. While the bucket seat is the best deal going, I have also used a black folding camp style chair when hunting in high cover. Its more comfortable, but doesnt offer any storage. Also my hunting buddies would mock me, call me lazy and ask when I was going to start toasting marshmallows over the fire. I got one on sale at the end of the summer for $8.99. Unlike my bucket, it lasted one season then fell apart due to rust. So I highly recommend the bucket.
Minimum cost: $10.00 plus taxes and shipping if any (recommended)
Maximum cost: $18.99 plus taxes and shipping, if any

CALLS:
This area can be more contentious than decoys, so we will keep it really simple. The writer assumes the beginning budget minded duck hunter is also a beginning caller. The only calls a new waterfowler needs yo get started are a mallard hen call, and a whistle. Of the two the whistle is easier to learn and blow. There are two types of mallard calls, double reed and single reed. For the beginner (and for many more accomplished callers as well) the double reed call is the easiest to blow. For this article we will only deal with double reed calls. With more calls on the market than ever, I will list those I have used, heard, know to work, and are affordable. Some of them come with instructional DVDs and those tutorials can be very valuable. The first call I suggest is the one I use myself to this day. That is the Buck Gardner Double Nasty II, a double reed, easy to blow call that sounds great. Cabelas offers this call with a DVD, an electronic calling coach and the call itself for $24.99. For the beginning duck hunter its a no-brainer. Another excellent beginning call is the Zink Power Hen 2. A friend of mine got this as his first call and he loves it. It is also a double reed call, easy to blow and sounds very ducky. Cabelas sells this call with an instructional DVD for $29.99. Probably the most popular beginning duck call is the Haydels DR-85. Many hunters start with this call and never change to another. Cabelas sells this call with what I feel to be one of the best instructional DVDs, Haydels Waterfowl Workshop. I first got this tutorial on cassette tape and still run it though a few times before every duck season. Pair this with my favorite whistle, Haydels MP-90 Magnum Pintail whistle and you are ready to begin calling ducks in a very short time. Again, Cabelas sells the call/DVD package for $24.99. You absolutely cannot miss with any of these three calls.
For whistles, which will call ducks like pintail, wigeon and teal, one must first determine if he can flutter his tongue or not. If one has the ability to do so, my favorite whistle and the one I still use is the aforementioned Haydels MP-90 Magnum Pintail Whistle. This is a very versatile and loud call, that also makes the mallard drake call. Cabelas sells it for $7.99. A long time favorite of hunters is the Wingsetter 8-in-1 whistle. This is probably the most popular whistle on the marsh. It uses a sliding reed to change pitch, and can also be used to call quail. This call can be found many places for less than $15.00. If you have trouble fluttering your tongue, Wingsetter makes the EasyFlutter call for $24.99, and the New Versions Morwhistle has a rolling ball that flutters for you and is available for under $20.00 at most hunting retailers and online stores.
Minimum cost: $32.98
Maximum cost: $54.98

Lastly you will need a call lanyard, and remember that you will only have 2 calls to begin with. I bought my first 3 call lanyard for $2.99 on sale, and have used it right up until this year when I am hesitantly adding a fourth call to my neck. Wing Supply still sells a 2 call lanyard for $2.99, or a 3 call for the same price. With the three call version, you can add another call as your skills progress.
Cost: $2.99

Hopefully some of the information and suggestions here can help new and prospective waterfowlers in getting out to the marshes and hunting ducks. These items are but a small drop in the bucket for whats available, and are by no means the only way to go. I encourage the hunter to research further, and learn all you can about the gear you are purchasing and the sport you are embarking on. Organizations such as Ducks Unlimited and California Waterfowl Association are excellent organizations and joining them not only helps our sport tremendously but also greatly increases a hunters knowledge and hunting opportunities. I highly recommend becoming a member in one or both of these fine institutions. While there are no hard and fast rules for duck hunting, some things you should always keep at the front of your mind are the utmost diligence in gun safety, sportsmanship, and always, always leave the blind in better condition than you found it. A small section on shotguns follows.



SHOTGUNS:
While this article is about getting started for under $500.00, I wanted to include this extra section, just in case the new hunter does not already have a shotgun. For the purpose of duck hunting, most ANY shotgun will suffice. There is a wider range of affordable ammunition available in 12 gauge, and this is the most common gun for waterfowl hunting. But the most important rule of thumb for getting started is use what you have. If you have an old Ithaca shotgun with a 2 chamber , thats a great gun. Or if you have an old side by side double barrel, you can kill birds with it. Just make sure the gun is safe to shoot steel shot. On that note, with todays non-toxic shot requirements a gun with a modified or more open choke is highly recommended. For waterfowl hunting the basic features you will want on a shotgun are a 3 chamber and interchangeable choke tubes. While neither of these are a necessity, there is a wider range of ammunition available with a 3 chamber and with the choke tube option you will have a more versatile gun. These features are common on most shotguns these days. Lastly, you DO NOT need the newest fancy shotgun in the newest camo pattern to kill ducks. I have killed just as many ducks with a shotgun that has blued metal and wood stock parts as I have with an all-black matte finish shotgun. I do not own a camo gun. Theres nothing wrong with them at all, they just cost more. For the purpose of this article I have kept my suggestions to 12 gauge shotguns with pump actions. All are available with 3 chambers, synthetic stocks, and three choke tubes in Improved Cylinder, Modified, and Full. The MSRP is listed, but these guns are very common and all can be found used in suitable condition for less.

1: Remington 870-
This is the most popular pump shotgun ever made. The gun is easy to break down and clean, is utterly upgradeable, and can be found at most any gun shop. Its the Jeep CJ of shotguns.
MSRP $383.00
2: Mossberg 500-
Thousands of waterfowlers will attest to the toughness and durability of the Mossberg 500. Many have started with this blue collar gun and have never drifted from it. The 500 is available with either a blued finish and a wood stock or with a matte finish and black synthetic stock for the same price, something not found in any of the other guns mentioned.
MSRP $375.00
3: Weatherby PA-08
Made in Turkey and with great features like a chrome lined barrel and matte finish, this is a great first shotgun. A friend of mine purchased one as his first shotgun, and loves it. I shot it and it is a very comfortable, dependable gun. If I didnt already have eight shotguns, I would add one to my safe.
MSRP: $328.00
4: Benelli Nova
This shotgun is the only one listed that comes standard with a 3.5 chamber. The Nova is tougher than a 2 dollar steak. It is quickly becoming a very common sight on the marsh. The polymer stock and receiver are a single piece making it very strong and weather resistant. Ask around. The name Benelli says a lot.
MSRP: $439.00
5: NEF H&R Pardner
If the first 4 guns are still too rich for your blood, dont worry. Theres hope in the form of the Pardner. New England firearms makes the most famous single shot gun of all time, the H&R Topper, and they have incorporated the same quality and legacy into the Pardner pump.The synthetic model features a chrome plated bolt, vent rib, and 3 chamber. It will kill ducks. This one only comes with a Modified choke tube, and is the most affordable of all guns mentioned here. The NEF website doesnt list a MSRP, but you can buy one on Gunbroker.com new in the box for $221.00, plus shipping.





This article is the property of the writer, Nathan A. Dorris and may be used or reprinted by permission of the writer only.
Written and copyright August 2011
 

ilovesprig

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Nathan,

Thanks for sharing.............Very nice read for any new waterfowlers.......................... :smiley_10sign:


Do you mind if I add one thing?........If a new wildfowler would join TOF, he can probably get most of that stuff for free.............. :lol:...............Well, except the Haydels DR 85, he'll need to buy.......$17.95 including CD.......... :smiley-thumbs-up-aqua:
 

RTIN

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Good write up Sir! :2: As Trig mentioned...... TOF is also a usefull source for info and meeting a bunch of great guys and maybe even a mentor. Heck you might not even have to pay for an old DR-85......I have 6 or 8 of those old things just laying around. :smiley-cool-shades-down:
 

fish dog

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Good article. One thing I could add that you can use if you'd like. If you're using the fishing sinker idea for decoy weights a good way to keep them from getting tangled is to get a supply of rubber bands and put a rubber band on each weight. Then you can just stretch the rubber band over the keel to keep the weights and line neat and untangled when you pick up your decoys. A bag of 45 heavy duty rubber bands at Staples is about $2 which would give you a few extras in case you break a few over the course of a season.
 

TwoShot

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Hey Nate, good job. Great read first thing Saturday morning over a cup of coffee. I know a guy that I will forward your article to. He has expressed some interest in waterfowl hunting, but has yet to get off the pot and do anything. Maybe your article will encourage him.

You know all this talk about hunting is getting me a little itchy, thank God its August and not May still
 

Huntndogs

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Throw in a tutorial for how to check in/out and be a good blind neighbor at Wister and your all set.

Good article...
 

bux-n-dux

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Thanks guys. I didn't get into techniques or styles because then it just would have been a 20 page article. I just wanted to cover some bare-bones basics for getting out and hunting. And since TOF is the only place on the web this article is available, if someone's reading it, they are already here.
 

ESSposse

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QUOTE (bux-n-dux @ Aug 6 2011, 10:01 AM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=332615
Thanks guys. I didn't get into techniques or styles because then it just would have been a 20 page article. I just wanted to cover some bare-bones basics for getting out and hunting. And since TOF is the only place on the web this article is available, if someone's reading it, they are already here.



12 responses and over 130 hits........ 14 members signed on and 164 visitors.....



............. someone(S) reading it.........

Yeah.... like we all said.... GREAT read......
 

HBTerry

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That is a very well written article, with great practical advice on what the essentials really are, and how little needs to be spent to rack up some ducks. I had better make sure my wife doesn't read it before I get to the Waterfowl Madness at Schumachers next week! That would put a real crimp in my spending!! :smiley-no-no-yellow:
 

spurgear

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Thanks for the info.

Is there any duck spots the veterans don't hunt that a new guy can cut his teeth on?
Obviously your not going to give up your current favorite spots but maybe one you dont hunt anymore? Hate to ask that much.

Thanks again.
 

bux-n-dux

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QUOTE (Fire/EMT @ Aug 6 2011, 11:01 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=332762
Thanks for the info.

Is there any duck spots the veterans don't hunt that a new guy can cut his teeth on?
Obviously your not going to give up your current favorite spots but maybe one you dont hunt anymore? Hate to ask that much.

Thanks again.



I live up near San Francisco, and while I have one spot that I hunt alone and don't tell anyone about, other than that I will help any new hunter get out and hunt ducks. I have shown guys around Grizzly island (as someone once showed me), and Napa/Sonoma Marsh. There is a ton of public land out there, and a good way to get started is to find a veteran to show you around a refuge. If I lived down south I could offer something but I have never hunted down there, so I don't know where to point you. But being a northerner I am in the minority on this site, so maybe someone else can suggest a place. And BTW, any spot that veterans DO NOT hunt, there will likely be a reason why they don't hunt there, such as lack of game, lousy conditions or limited accessibility.

bux-n-dux
 

Aeon

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In my head the number one thing is just get out and do it. Even if you only have a few decoys and no call. A pair of waders 5 years past their due date and a beat up old gun, just do it. You will learn quick what works and what does not. You will look stupid at times and other hunters will be all to happy to make fun of you but a few will help you along the way. Good duck hunters have been wet frozen covered in mud and like the book title says misery loves company.

The worse thing that could happen is you get to see dawn on a wetland and trust me when I say, that alone is worth it.

Fire/emt there are no so cal spots that hold ducks that anyone is going to give up. Public land you can duck hunt is like gold. Get some reservations for San jacinto or wister and cut your teeth there. If you want to work hard and I do mean hard you will learn where the public land is and then the real work starts.
 

ilovesprig

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QUOTE (Aeon @ Aug 7 2011, 02:54 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=332848
In my head the number one thing is just get out and do it. Even if you only have a few decoys and no call. A pair of waders 5 years past their due date and a beat up old gun, just do it. You will learn quick what works and what does not. You will look stupid at times and other hunters will be all to happy to make fun of you but a few will help you along the way. Good duck hunters have been wet frozen covered in mud and like the book title says misery loves company.

The worse thing that could happen is you get to see dawn on a wetland and trust me when I say, that alone is worth it.

Fire/emt there are no so cal spots that hold ducks that anyone is going to give up. Public land you can duck hunt is like gold. Get some reservations for San jacinto or wister and cut your teeth there. If you want to work hard and I do mean hard you will learn where the public land is and then the real work starts.



Nicely stated................. :2:

The Salton Sea has tons of public hunting opportunities. And you can certainly hunt it for under $500.00's worth of equipment...........Where waterfowling gets expensive is the other stuff.......Kind of like golf...............Although, the green fees at Wister are pretty reasonable............................. :lol:
 

fish dog

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QUOTE (Fire/EMT @ Aug 6 2011, 11:01 PM) index.php?act=findpost&pid=332762
Thanks for the info.

Is there any duck spots the veterans don't hunt that a new guy can cut his teeth on?
Obviously your not going to give up your current favorite spots but maybe one you dont hunt anymore? Hate to ask that much.

Thanks again.



Hey Fire/EMT just in case you missed it check this out...


San Jacinto Work Day

Coming up this Saturday. If you can make it you can get some good info here and meet a lot of good guys.
 
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